Reader’s Digest’s 100th anniversary | The Economist’s Selection of morning newspapers around the world

2022-05-05 0 By

Article/Wang Zhili (wechat official Account:Reader’s Digest Digest February 1922 a new kind of magazine was launched. The brainchild of DeWitt Wallace,Reader’s Digest Promised Articles “Of Enduring Value and Interest,In condensed and compact form “Started from Wallace’s Basement in Greenwich Village, New York City,with help from his wife and occasionally the patrons of the speakeasy upstairs, the pocket-sized publication would eventually be published in 22 languages and sold in 40 countries.It is often Dismissed as a staple of dentists’ waiting rooms,replete with self-improvement tips and mailshots for prize draws. But that reputation belies a history of advocacy. Reader’s Digest Digest for organ donation,warned of the perils of tobacco and decried the savagery of the Khmer Rouge. It allowed Betty Ford, Wife of President Gerald Ford, to discuss her addiction and supported Alex Haley’s research for his novel “Roots”,which transformed American perceptions of slavery. A century on, Few content-aggregator sites in the Reader’s Digest mould can boast of promoting such worthy causes.Reader’s DigestReader’s Digest is an American magazine published in many countries and regions around the world.Founded in 1922, it is a monthly publication.An informative family magazine with a wide range of interests.It covers stories and articles in the fields of health, ecology, government, international affairs, sports, tourism, science, business, education and humor.In February 1922 a new kind of magazine was launched. The brainchild of DeWitt Wallace, Reader’s Digest Promised Articles “Of Enduring Value and Interest,In condensed and compact form “Started from Wallace’s Basement in Greenwich Village, New York City,with help from his wife and occasionally the patrons of the speakeasy upstairs, The pocket-sized publication would eventually be published in 22 languages and sold in 40 countries. In February 1922, a new magazine was published.The brainchild of DeWitt Wallace, Reader’s Digest promised articles that would be “concise and timeless.”Born in Wallace’s basement in New York City’s Greenwich Village, with the help of his wife and occasional patronage from hotel patrons upstairs, the pocket-sized publication would eventually be published in 22 languages and sold in 40 countries.Kind of C.A little bit;Launched, launched, launched, launchedTo go public; issue;Make water;The brainchild of the launch was the Digest.Grasp;Understanding;Understanding;In this paper.The profile;Abstract;Compilation promised;Commitment.Promise;Guarantee;Make likely;Signal;When the past participles and past tenses of promise are enduring,Durable;Patience;Endure;Continue;Persistent;C. condensed D. endureEnrichment;Condensation;Condensation;To thicken or thicken;3. To shrink or compress;Condense Past participle and past tense: Greenwich Village, New York City occasionally.Once in a while.By accident;Patrons sometimes on patrons;A nominal sponsor;Regular customers;Customers;Regular customers;The patron’s plural speakeasy illegally operated upstairs in a hotel upstairs;Upstairs.On the second floor.All floors above the second floor;Upstairs;Pocket -sized at the previous level;Portable It is often dismissed as a staple of dentists’ waiting rooms,replete with self-improvement tips and mailshots for prize draws. But that reputation belies a history of advocacy. Reader’s Digest Digest for organ donation,warned of the perils of tobacco and decried the savagery of the Khmer Rouge. It allowed Betty Ford, Wife of President Gerald Ford, to discuss her addiction and supported Alex Haley’s research for his novel “Roots”,which transformed American perceptions of slavery. A century on, Few content-aggregator sites in the Reader’s Digest mould can boast of promoting such worthy causes.It is often dismissed as a staple of dentist waiting rooms, filled with self-improvement advice and raffle mail.But that reputation belies a history worth advocating.Reader’s Digest launched an organ donation campaign, warned about the dangers of tobacco and condemned the brutal practices of the Khmer Rouge.It allowed Betty Ford, the wife of President Gerald Ford, to discuss her addiction and supported Alex Haley’s research on his novel “Roots.”The novel changed the way Americans thought about slavery.A century later, few content aggregators in the Reader’s Digest model can boast of promoting such a worthy cause.In consequence of his work, he was dismissed as…Staple C.A. waiting rooms B. waiting roomsWaiting room.The waiting room.5. waiting roomEnough;Very satisfied;Feed;Self-improvement of honeypot ants;Self-improvement belies dissembling;The cover;Make the…Give a false impression;Incorrect display;Prove error;Belie’s third person singular advocacy;Support;Support;Plead in court;2. Lawyers’ working schooling is seriously dangerous;Evil;Danger;The third person singular and plural of the peril decried;Criticism;Decry’s past participle and past tense savagery brutality perceptions;Perception;Insight;Understanding;View;Opinions;Perception: plural slavery;Slavery;Slave-holding mould;Mold;Type, personality, style;Mildew;The mold;To cast or shape;For…Significant impact;Will be…Shaped;In the fall of 1976, Roots, a family story by Alex Haley, was published in the United States.Author claims he after twelve years of research study, back to his more than six generations of ancestors, Kunta Kent, a from the west coast of Africa by white black slave traffickers to North America as slaves, described his free life in Africa, he and his sons ordeal under slavery in the United States, and the experience of getting free after the family.Once published, the book became a universal bestseller.At the same time, it has attracted diameterically opposite reviews and become the focus of fierce debate.Therefore, the issue of “Roots” is an event of high social significance and academic nature, which is worth studying and discussing.